What to Watch Out for If You Buy Vitamins Online

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Buying supplements online can be a great way to save money and also find truly quality brands. If you are not familiar with the particular brand you are purchasing however, you could be exposing yourself to unwanted toxins, or even hastily-prepared compounds that have been sourced from un-healthy substances. Check out our article on pharmaceutical grade supplements to get a better understanding of the attributes that make a quality brand. If you shop trusted brands, and do your homework, buying vitamins or supplements online is a wonderful method of saving money, and ensuring quality. As with all things however, one must be careful to avoid inferior products.

From GreenMedInfo:

Unknown to most consumers, cyanide is found in a wide range of vitamins and foods in a form known as cyanocobalamin.  Fortunately the cyanide has a very low potential to do harm because it is organically bound to cobalamin (vitamin b12) — that is, as long as everything is working correctly and that person hasn’t already been burdened with environmental chemical exposures from cyanide, and related xenobiotic compunds.

Cyanocobalamin is actually found in 99% of the vitamins on the market which contain B12, as it is relatively cheap (recovered from activated sewage sludge or produced through total chemical synthesis), and stable (non-perishable). Despite its wide usage, it is not an ideal form of vitamin b12, as the cyanide must be removed from the cobalamin before it can perform its biological indispensable roles within the body. While there is plenty of research on the potential value of cyanide-bound vitamin B12, it does have potential to do harm.

Cyanocobalamin is actually found in 99% of the vitamins on the market … [which is] recovered from activated sewage sludge

In fact, when a person is poisoned with cyanide, as sometimes happens following smoke inhalation, and they are rushed to the emergency room, what do they give them to remove the cyanide? Hydroxocobalamin — a natural form of vitamin b12 — which readily binds with the cyanide, becoming cyanocobalmin (which sequesters the cyanide and puts it into a form ideal for detoxification and elimination), which is then rapidly excreted from the body via the lungs and kidneys.

Those with a higher body burden or higher cyanide exposure, such as smokers, are less likely to be able to effectively detoxify the additional cyanide they consume through their diet or supplements, making the seemingly benign levels found in some vitamins and foods a real problem.

Indeed, this is not the first time the question of the potential toxicity of cyanocobalamin has been raised. As far back as 1992, a report was published in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine arguing for its withdrawal from use in vitamin therapy. Another study published in 1997 in the journal Blood, found that cyanocobalamin “antagonizes vitamin B12 in vitro and causes cell death from methionine deficiency.”

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