Collectivism and engineered perception

From Jon Rappoport:

The primary feature of The Group is: its members look at events indirectly; they look at events in accordance with what they think other members are seeing; they don’t look at or judge an event through their own eyes or minds.

This method of seeing is, in fact, empty. It’s a fantasy. It’s like passing around an unknown object, from hand to hand, and describing it as you believe everyone else will describe it.

You are always listening for “an echo effect” before it happens.

And you claim the echo effect is what you perceive.

It’s a rank absurdity.

It creates a foundation of zeroes, in all areas of human life.

High-IQ idiots will tell you this is the only way society can operate. Why? Because they no longer know what a free and independent individual is. They no longer know what it means to see things as they actually see them. And when they vaguely sniff out a free individual, they recoil in horror.

In the early days of the American Republic, as the two-party system developed, certain men saw that it was moving toward collectivism.

In phase one, it was evolving into polarized opposition, with neither side actually expressing clear and direct perception. It was an engineered A versus B, with each side saying whatever it could, in order to win popular support.

And beyond that, it was a PRETENSE of polarized opposition. Behind the scenes, both parties, and the men who owned them, were simply building up the power of centralized government—and figuring out how to appeal to the population on the basis of “shared consensus” and “the greatest good for the greatest number.”

In other words: “how can we get the masses to think they’re all perceiving the same thing, the thing we want them to perceive?”

John Adams, in the early days of the Republic, saw …

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