Comprehensive map of primate brain development published in Nature

From Allen Institute:

Researchers at the Allen Institute for Brain Science have published an in-depth analysis of a comprehensive molecular atlas of brain development in the non-human primate. This analysis uncovers features of the genetic code underlying brain development in our close evolutionary relative, while revealing distinct features of human brain development by comparison. The study is based on the NIH Blueprint Non-Human Primate (NHP) Atlas, a publicly available resource created by the Allen Institute and colleagues at the University of California, Davis and the California National Primate Research Center. This resource enables researchers to understand the underpinnings of both healthy brain development and many neuropsychiatric diseases. Analysis of the atlas is featured this week in the journal Nature.

“This is the most complete spatiotemporal map we have for any mammal’s development, and we have it in a model system that provides directly meaningful insight into human brain development, structure, and function,” says Ed Lein, Ph.D., Investigator at the Allen Institute for Brain Science. “This exceptional dataset is useful for exploring precisely where and when genes are active in relation to the events of brain development and the onset of brain disorders.”

“Collaborating with the NIH on this project allowed us to make use of the Allen Institute’s unique capabilities to generate high-quality, large scale data resources that enable the scientific community around the world to make valuable discoveries,” says Allan Jones, Ph.D., CEO of the Allen Institute.

“While we know many of the details of gene expression in the adult brain, mapping gene expression across development has been one of the missing links for understanding the genetics of disorders like autism and schizophrenia,” says Thomas R. Insel, Ph.D., former Director of the National Institute of Mental Health. “This new atlas will be the foundation for the next generation of studies linking the genetics of neurodevelopmental …

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