Criminal Charges Filed Against City Employees in Michigan Water Crisis

flint-michigan-water-contamination-crisis-news

From MLIVE:

Felony and misdemeanor charges have been issued against three state and city employees in connection to the city’s water crisis.

Genesee District Court Judge Tracy Collier-Nix authorized charges, Wednesday, April 20, for Flint employee Michael Glasgow and Michigan Department of Environmental Quality employees Steven Busch and Michael Prysby.

Glasgow is accused of tampering with evidence when he allegedly changed testing results to show there was less lead in city water than there actually was. He is also charged with willful neglect of office.

Prysby and Busch are charged with misconduct in office, conspiracy to tamper with evidence, tampering with evidence, a treatment violation of the Michigan Safe Drinking Water Act and a monitoring violation of the Safe Drinking Water.

None of the individuals charged in the case have been arraigned.

The three were not in court when the warrants were issued and no attorneys for the men were present.

Charged with misconduct in office, conspiracy to tamper with evidence, tampering with evidence, a treatment violation of the Michigan Safe Drinking Water Act

Schuette’s office claims Prysby and Busch knowingly misled Environmental Protection Agency regulator Miguel Del Toral that the city was using proper corrosion control when they knew the city was not.

They are also accused of impeding the Genesee County Health Department’s investigation into a Legionella outbreak that left 12 people dead and manipulating lead testing results to show the city’s water is safe.

Prysby, then a district engineer with the the state’s Office of Drinking Water and Municipal Assistance, allegedly told Glasgow that phosphate wasn’t requiredwhen Flint switched to a local river for water in 2014, Glasgow said during testimony at a legislative hearing last month.

Busch, former DEQ district supervisor in the division, was suspended earlier this year pending an investigation tied to Flint water.

Busch’s name appears on a number of documents that were penned as the Flint water crisis unfolded after the city began using the Flint River as its drinking water source in 2014.

Busch, with the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality’s drinking water division, told other DEQ officials in a March 26, 2013, email that the use of the river could lead to multiple problems, including increased disinfectant by-products and microbials in the water, which could put the public’s health at risk.

Continue Reading