Illegally Made Fentanyl Seems To Be Fueling A Spike In Overdoses

From NPR:

A report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that there was a 426 percent increase in seized drug products that tested positive for fentanyl from 2013 to 2014. And separate data show the number of deaths involving synthetic opioids, a class that includes fentanyl, rose 79 percent during that same period. Among 27 U.S. states analyzed, there was a strong correlation between increases in synthetic opioid deaths and in seized fentanyl products, according to data published Thursday in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

That suggests, the authors say, that fentanyl is driving the spike in overdoses. (Deaths attributed specifically to fentanyl aren’t reported in national data.)

Fentanyl is available by prescription to treat severe pain. But the fentanyl that’s currently on the streets — usually mixed into heroin and often without the user’s knowledge — isn’t from diverted pharmaceutical products. Instead it’s being illicitly manufactured, according to the government.

“Starting in 2013, the production of illegally manufactured fentanyl increased to unprecedented levels, fueled by increases in the global supply, processing and distribution of fentanyl and fentanyl-precursor chemicals by criminal organizations,” the report says. Between 2014 and 2015 alone, the number of seized fentanyl products rose from 5,343 to 13,882.

More recently, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration said in July that fentanyl was also showing up in counterfeit pain pills. Prince died of a self-administered dose of fentanyl, and the Minneapolis Star Tribune recently reported that pills identified as hydrocodone found at the musician’s Paisley Park studio actually contained fentanyl.

The report says an “urgent” response from law enforcement and public health is necessary to tackle the fentanyl problem, including more testing for fentanyl in areas where it’s a big problem. The government has advocated the expanded use of naloxone, an antidote to opioid drugs, as …

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