NASA releases ‘Omics: Advancing personalized medicine from space to Earth’

From NASA/Johnson Space Center:

IMAGE: Expedition 45/46 Commander, former astronaut Scott Kelly (right) along with his twin brother, former astronaut Mark Kelly (left) speak to media about the Twins Study and One-Year Mission. view more

Credit: NASA

NASA’s Human Research Program (HRP) is releasing the video “Omics: Advancing Personalized Medicine from Space to Earth”, to highlight its Twins Study, coinciding with National Twins Days. This is the last video in a series of eight which explores space through you by using omics to look more closely at the unique health of an individual.

Breakthroughs in science and technology are providing researchers with additional data allowing for a more personalized approach to healthcare. The previous one-size-fits-all approach to medicine is slowly shifting to more personalized care for individuals or precision medicine.

Omics integrates multiple biological disciplines to focus on measurements of a diverse array of biomolecules. It combines genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, epigenomics, metabolomics and microbiomics to see a larger, more comprehensive picture of the human body at a fundamental, highly granular level.

Twins Study Principal Investigators are using omics to compare molecular data of retired, identical twin astronauts Scott and Mark Kelly. It compares nearly identical genomes of one twin, Scott, on a defined diet, strict exercise regime, scripted daily work schedule, and space stressors, and Mark, the other twin, on Earth engaged in normal life. The identical genome comparison allows researchers to focus on the other molecular effects of the integrated spaceflight environment.

Researchers see more molecular reactions between biomolecules than ever before. This technological phenomenon is similar to the early 2000s when NASA-funded survey observatories discovered about 1,000 asteroids that were classified as near-Earth objects (NEO). Today, discoveries of NEOs have increased to more than 14,000 asteroids due to improved sensors and detection equipment and other technologies …

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